Daily Archives: April 17, 2017

WHY KNEE PROBLEMS HAPPEN!![dislocation explained]


Did you know that the knee is the most commonly injured joint with an estimated 2.5 MILLION sports-related injuries every single year?!

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Funny part is, most of the time, knee pain happens not because there is something wrong with the knee, but due to dysfunction in the joints ABOVE (hip) and BELOW (ankle) the knee

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When patellar dislocations happen (left knee pictured) many therapists will WRONGLY emphasize the importance of taping the patella in place or strengthening the VMO muscle in order to “stabilize” the patella

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Let’s use an analogy to explain why 👎🏼overstabilizing the patella is a dumb idea!

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If we were to use the analogy of a 🚂train rolling on rails, most of the time when an accident or malfunction happens it’s because of the rails, not because of the train. (Especially in Bond Movies. Villains always ❤️ to blow up rails 😝)

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Similarly, the patella is a train that just follows whatever myofascial “rails” you give it!! You don’t try to fix a train going off the rails by “stabilizing the train” or “adding strength/power to the engine of the train”. You do it by fixing the 🛤

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If you look at the mechanics of a knee dislocation, they happen when the femur is excessively internally rotated in relation to the patella/tibia

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If your leg bone (femur) is going inwards and you can’t control it’s deceleration, the patella will end up LATERAL to the knee and “derail”

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Situations that can derail your patella

1️⃣you can’t control the speed at which your femur decelerates. Femur moves faster than patella = derail 😞

2️⃣you can’t externally rotate your femur fast enough when your extend your knee. Femur moves slower than patella = derail 😩

3️⃣you get hit and it causes your femur to go in a direction faster than your patella = Your ACL explodes and your patella…DERAILS!😵

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Basically people fuck up their knees when the femur and the patella don’t travel at the speed required to keep the train glued to the moving rails

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A better rehab protocol would involve neuromuscular drills to recondition the knee to move in a strong+coordinated fashion

Gluteus Medius


 (GM) is a hugely important muscle in terms of controlling the proximal lower quarter and, in many cases, preventing injury and/or pain.••••••••••

GM is described as being a hip abductor, but it is also intimately involved in controlling other aspects of the kinetic chain in the frontal plane of motion. For instance, a lack of GM control can contribute to not only medial knee collapse (hip adduction), but also to contralateral pelvic drop (shown in this image) and lateral bending of the trunk. A lack of control at the hip, pelvis or trunk could lead to pain in the knee, hip or lumbar region in instances where the lack of frontal plane control occurs frequently such as running.

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