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STRETCHING TOO MUCH⁉️


This is an important post if you or someone you know has chronic pain and can’t figure things out. ⤵️

Hypermobility syndrome describes a connective tissue predisposition that allows joints to easily move beyond their normal range of motion. If you have done the splits at some point in your life, you are probably on this spectrum. Women are affected more than men. 🙋🏼 Hypermobility isn’t always a problem; only when there is pain and discomfort associated with it. If you are very flexible, but you feel tight and have pain, this might be you. 🤔

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The Beighton Scale (shown above) consists of 5 tests: .

1️⃣ Do your elbows hyperextend? .

2️⃣ Do your fingers bend back past 90 degrees?

3️⃣ Can you bend your thumb to your arm? .

4️⃣ Do your knees hyperextend? .

5️⃣ Can you touch your palms to the floor?

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If you answered “yes” to more than 2 of those, you are on the hypermobility scale. ⚠️The key focus of your “corrective” training should be stability and strengthening through a full range of motion. Mobility without stability is a problem. Despite some short term relief, stretching can actually be harmful in this scenario. Don’t let it fool you!

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The typical painful hypermobile patient has had pain for a long time. ✔️ They have tried a few different things to improve, but all with minimal success. 😞 Their pain is usually bearable, but it can still have a profound impact on quality of life and athletic endeavors. .

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One common complaint you might hear from the hypermobile patient is they “feel tight.” 🤔 This perceived tightness is a result of a neurological tone and drive attempting to stabilize. It will decrease with strengthening. In activities where mobility is advantageous, such as gymnastics or throwing, there is a careful interplay between mobility and stability.

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The key takeaway here: know YOUR body and best know how to treat it. If you are extremely mobile, focus on strength and stability. As with all training and rehab, the approach should be individualized and tailor fitted. Fit the program to person, not the other way around. 👊🏼 

WHY KNEE PROBLEMS HAPPEN!![dislocation explained]


Did you know that the knee is the most commonly injured joint with an estimated 2.5 MILLION sports-related injuries every single year?!

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Funny part is, most of the time, knee pain happens not because there is something wrong with the knee, but due to dysfunction in the joints ABOVE (hip) and BELOW (ankle) the knee

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When patellar dislocations happen (left knee pictured) many therapists will WRONGLY emphasize the importance of taping the patella in place or strengthening the VMO muscle in order to “stabilize” the patella

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Let’s use an analogy to explain why 👎🏼overstabilizing the patella is a dumb idea!

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If we were to use the analogy of a 🚂train rolling on rails, most of the time when an accident or malfunction happens it’s because of the rails, not because of the train. (Especially in Bond Movies. Villains always ❤️ to blow up rails 😝)

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Similarly, the patella is a train that just follows whatever myofascial “rails” you give it!! You don’t try to fix a train going off the rails by “stabilizing the train” or “adding strength/power to the engine of the train”. You do it by fixing the 🛤

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If you look at the mechanics of a knee dislocation, they happen when the femur is excessively internally rotated in relation to the patella/tibia

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If your leg bone (femur) is going inwards and you can’t control it’s deceleration, the patella will end up LATERAL to the knee and “derail”

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Situations that can derail your patella

1️⃣you can’t control the speed at which your femur decelerates. Femur moves faster than patella = derail 😞

2️⃣you can’t externally rotate your femur fast enough when your extend your knee. Femur moves slower than patella = derail 😩

3️⃣you get hit and it causes your femur to go in a direction faster than your patella = Your ACL explodes and your patella…DERAILS!😵

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Basically people fuck up their knees when the femur and the patella don’t travel at the speed required to keep the train glued to the moving rails

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A better rehab protocol would involve neuromuscular drills to recondition the knee to move in a strong+coordinated fashion

Gluteus Medius


 (GM) is a hugely important muscle in terms of controlling the proximal lower quarter and, in many cases, preventing injury and/or pain.••••••••••

GM is described as being a hip abductor, but it is also intimately involved in controlling other aspects of the kinetic chain in the frontal plane of motion. For instance, a lack of GM control can contribute to not only medial knee collapse (hip adduction), but also to contralateral pelvic drop (shown in this image) and lateral bending of the trunk. A lack of control at the hip, pelvis or trunk could lead to pain in the knee, hip or lumbar region in instances where the lack of frontal plane control occurs frequently such as running.

Massage Therapist 


Having an underlying sense of history is important for massage therapists emerging as modern health and wellness professionals. Knowing where you came from, the core of your professional identity, provides a strong foundation from which you can move into the future with integrity. Recounting former times also spurs “aha moments” as the world of the past opens up and we understand for the first time how things we see today came to be. Our profession begins to make more sense—the diversity, the independent streak, the holistic viewpoint, the affinity for natural healing, and the singularity of our vocation as massage therapists.-

Tracing the professional lineage of massage therapists in America today takes us back to colonial times and continues from there through generations of practitioners advancing to the present day. Progress through the decades was impacted by national and world events, advances in science and medicine, and religious and social movements—the larger context in which massage therapists of the past lived and worked. 

Inflammation


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99% of the time our body’s inflammatory process is viewed negatively when we need to remember how vital this process is to healing. Between special diets, medication, electrical and thermal modalities (TENS, ice, etc) and other strategies to limit inflammation, we often forget that the inflammatory process is our immune system’s initial response to musculoskeletal trauma and a necessary step in the repair and remodeling of tissue.

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Postural Correction


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It seems we can’t go five minutes without someone telling us our posture sucks and we need to do such and such exercises to correct it or else.

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Well, what does science say on the matter 🤔? It basically says exercise does not impact postural alignment and, furthermore, we probably shouldn’t care a whole lot. The key message so often in kinesiology is that we are all built and move differently. This variability is seen in our posture too, which means the idea that there is some gold-standard of posture we should all strive for is bullsh*^t.

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So, what should you be concerned about when it comes to posture? •Being in one position for too long. Static positioning often pisses the nervous system off not because you are in a less than optimal position, but because you haven’t used your body in several hours. Get up and move! •Posture under load. There are certain positions that may make one more prone to injury when the system is under heavy load, say with resistance training. So, yes, pay attention to posture/form in these scenarios.

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Outside of these two situations, stop worrying about your posture. There is no normal to shoot for. Your posture is your normal. Embrace it and move often!

Cartilage Health


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Of our major synovial joints, the knee and hip are most affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Although the exact cause of OA is unknown and probably varies somewhat from person to person, factors such as advanced age and mechanical injury to a joint are associated with the development of OA. As the condition progresses, articular cartilage begins to soften and demonstrate fibrillations (shown here). At the same time, the underlying bone may hypertrophy due to having to accommodate extra stress as the cartilage matrix becomes disrupted.

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So, what can you do to help maintain cartilage health? There are a few things and they revolve around loading the cartilage appropriately in order to help optimize nutrient delivery to this tissue. First and foremost, excessive stress (increased height to weight ratio, excessive exercise without sufficient rest, etc) have been associated with early cartilage breakdown. On the flip side, inadequate loading of cartilage (sedentary lifestyle) and not using a joint through it’s full range of motion may impair nutrient delivery. Cartilage, unlike many other tissues, does not have a pump to deliver nutrients, so it relies on a special type of diffusion called imbibition. You can think of your articular cartilage like a sponge and in order for water, synovial fluid and nutrients to move in and out, the sponge must be squished (loaded) and then unloaded so that absorption can occur. This is why loading a joint appropriately throughout the day (this might mean losing a little weight or modifying your exercise program) and using our joints through a full range of motion are so important for maintaining cartilage health long-term.

HOW TO DECOMPRESS YOUR NECK![neck posture fix]


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Stretching the neck is definitely a good idea, but if it isn’t combined with neck decompression exercises, it will only help transiently!

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The most basic neck decompression exercise is the CHIN TUCK! (See above)

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The idea is that when you’re stuck in forward head posture (FHP-🅰), your upper cervicals gets stuck in too much extension and your lower cervicals are in too much flexion. As you perform the chin tuck (🅱) , you introduce more upper cervical FLEXION and more lower cervical EXTENSION into your system

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This simple exercise will increases upper and middle thoracic extension and also puts a good active stretch on all the superficial neck muscles/fascia/ligaments of the posterior cervical and upper thoracic spine as well as the sub-occipitals muscles

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It serves a dual-purpose of lengthening short muscles and strengthening 💪🏼 key postural muscles, which act against gravity and are subject to postural fatigue

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👉🏼Remember that while doing this exercise you’re trying to POSTERIORLY translate your head back (like a 🐢) you do NOT want the head to tilt back. The head must remain parallel with the body throughout the movement (you’re essentially giving yourself a double-chin at end range 😝)

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Start with 3 sets of 5-10 reps every day and slowly build up to 12-15 reps!

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Do muscles attach to bone? -🍲 for 💭 –


Almost everywhere anatomy 💀 is taught that muscles 💪 are individual units, but research 📚 shows that fascia distributes strain 🔄through neighboring structures or pit stops (muscles) which is over 600 stops..

The myofascial bag is 1️⃣one big network that forms, stabilizes and moves🤼‍♂️ the joints and skelton. Let’s consider that the outter layer of the bag would be a freeway 🚗 (fascial network) and the inner bag would be the freeway exits 🚧(muscles) so it’s not an end just a quick ✋ stop. It’s all one big road.. with a lot of stops along the way. –

Sooo. Does the brain recognize attachments from muscle to bone? 🤔

Double Crush Phenomenon 


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Pain resulting from compromise of neural structures (neuropathic pain) is common in various regions of the body and is often thought to be associated with excessive tension or compression on a nerve leading to ischemia (loss of blood flow). One of the most familiar syndromes associated with neuropathic pain is carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In this case, the median nerve is thought to be compromised at the carpal tunnel of the wrist.
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What many people are not told is that there is a concept referred to a the double crush phenomenon where it is believed that when a nerve is compromised in one area along it’s path, then it is more likely to demonstrate symptoms somewhere else. In the example of CTS and the median nerve there are numerous areas where the median nerve could run into problems including the neck, inter-scalene triangle, near the first rib, under pectoralis minor, under the pronator trees muscle and at the carpal tunnel. When these areas are addressed, through conservative care, the carpal tunnel symptoms (usually found in the hand) often clear up. So, before rushing into surgery or allowing someone else to do so for neuropathic pain, make sure they are examined by a practitioner who can check the entire nerve’s path. All too often we see patients who have surgeries like a carpal tunnel release and are found to be no different than individuals who only underwent conservative care at long-term follow-ups.

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